Notebooking Safari-Singapore and the Crab-Eating Macaque

 

Singapore and the Crab-Eating Macaque Safari Notebooking Page

Our next stop in our notebooking safari across Asia takes us to Singapore. If you’re new to the notebooking safari, visit our first stop here. To see all the notebooking safari posts, click here.

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The next animal I want you to see is called a crab-eating (or long-tailed) macaque. There are around twenty different species of macaques, and all but one of them come from Asia. The smallest species is the long-tailed macaque, which is sometimes called the crab-eating macaque. They only grow to weigh around five pounds (for the females) to around twelve pounds (for the males).

Unlike the proboscis monkey and the orangutan that we’ve met recently, the macaques enjoy time on the ground and in the trees. They also seem to love getting wet, which would probably come in handy when they are fishing for crabs!

They eat more than crabs, though. They love fruit, and they even eat insects and other small animals. Come on, let’s go down to the water and see if we can spot a troop of macaques!

To watch some crab-eating macaques having some fun in the water, click here.*

*Note to parents: There is offensive language in the comments beneath the video. Please view the video on full screen to avoid displaying the comment section.

Use this website to answer the following questions:

True or False:

1. If I am a young macaque, I had better be on the lookout for eagles flying overhead—one might think I look like a meal.

2. I am an endangered species.

3. My most noticeable characteristic is my long tail.

Research challenge:  Macaques in general (not only crab-eating macaques), along with rhesus monkeys, are the types of monkeys most often used in biomedical research. In the 1950s, macaques were used in the development of a vaccine against what disease? 

Here is a printable notebooking page to enjoy!

Notebooking Safari-India and the Bengal Tiger Part Two

 

India and the Bengal Tiger Safari Notebooking Page

Our next stop in our notebooking safari across Asia takes us to Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu in India. If you’re new to the notebooking safari, visit our first stop here. To see all the notebooking safari posts, click here.

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Last week we watched a Bengal tiger in the swamp. Today, let’s go see if we can watch one in the forest. First, we’ll need to spot one—without getting too close!

Look there—in that tall, thick grass. I think I saw something move. I have my binoculars with me. Let me see if I can tell if it’s a tiger if I look through them.

It is! It’s a mother tiger with two cubs. Look and see for yourself. It looks like they are playing. The little ones are rolling back and forth, climbing on top of one another and on top of the mother!

We don’t dare get any closer. A mother tiger will protect her cubs from anything that tries to bother them!

It’s starting to get dark. She’ll go on the hunt soon. Her cubs are still too little to hunt for themselves, so she will go find something that will provide for herself and them. She might bring back a deer or an antelope, a wild pig or a goat, or maybe even a small rhinoceros!

To hear a Bengal tiger’s growl, click here.

Using the information you find here, answer the following questions:

True or False:

1. A full-grown tiger could be nine feet long.

2. You can hear a tiger roar up to two miles away.

3. A tiger usually eats 100 pounds of meat each night.

Research challenge:  Do a tiger’s stripes go deeper than its fur coat? In other words, is a tiger’s skin striped, too, or just its fur?

Here is a printable notebooking page to enjoy!

Johnny Appleseed Unit Study

Who-is-Johnny-Appleseed

I've been working with my friend Jill Craft over on Blessed Beyond a Doubt, and we have a new free printable to share! The Johnny Appleseed Unit Study is specially designed for K-4th grade. Inside, you'll find thirty pages of fun facts activities … [Continue reading]

Education and Lesson Plans

God and the Lesson Plans

It's been a busy week already for me for guest posts! If you'd like a free printable about the number of children around the world who are unable to go to school this fall due to poverty and other circumstances, please stop by my post Back to School … [Continue reading]

Art Appreciation Study Freebie and a Sale

Fine Art Pages Freebie

{This post contains affiliate links.} I have two new fine art specials to tell you about! The first is a set of Fine Art Pages from Classical Composers Monthly. They are giving it away free right now, so stop over and grab a set if you're looking … [Continue reading]

National No Rhyme or Reason Day

Could you use some help teaching poetry to kids? Could you use some copywork of twenty-five English words that have no true rhyme? Stop by the Schoolhouse Review Crew for my roundup and freebie today! … [Continue reading]